Workshop Presenters

Presenters Topic/Title
Sara Ahmed Global Issues
Bob Bain Social Studies / Humanities
Tim Chartier Mathematics
Kim Cofino Technology
Rick Crosslin Science
Linda Elkins-Tanton Science/Mathematics
Vlad Gogelescu Service Learning / Global Politics
Susan Gomez-Zwiep Science
Shannon Hancock General Education
Tanya Howden Computer Science
Steph Jones Global Issues : Human Trafficking
Lee Ann Jung General Education : Assessment
Cathryn Kaye Service Learning
Stuart Lowe Computer Science
d'Arcy Lunn Global Citizenship
Fawn Nguyen Mathematics
Karen Polak General Education
Marty Schmidt Humanities / Service Learning
Candida Snow Global Competence
Julie Stern General Education : Transform Teaching
James Tanton Mathematics
Rick Wormeli General Education Topics : Assessment - Middle School
John Zola Social Studies / Humanities


Sara Ahmed
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Bob Bain
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Tim Chartier
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Kim Cofino
Biography:
Kim Cofino is an author, entrepreneur, educational consultant, curriculum designer and teacher originally from the United States and currently based in Bangkok, Thailand. Her work is based on nearly two decades of classroom experience teaching in Germany, Malaysia, Thailand, and Japan. Kim is the co-founder and CEO of Eduro Learning, COETAIL, and Board Secretary of the Learning 2.0 Global Conference. In addition to being a regular presenter, workshop leader and keynote speaker at conferences around the world, she has written and contributed to a wide variety of publications, including her recent book, Your Connected Classroom: A Practical Guide for Teachers. An experienced learning coach, Kim now helps other coaches improve their practice by designing high quality online courses for coaches, serving as the Premium Mentor for the Eduro Learning The Coach Microcredential, supporting individual coaches through private mentorships, hosting the #coachbetter podcast, and creating accessible and practical video content on the Eduro Learning YouTube channel. Kim loves sharing her passion for innovative learning with teachers, coaches, school leaders and parents! Find out more about Kim at kimcofino.com

WORKSHOP 1
Title: So, your students want to be YT stars?
A recent report found more students want to be YouTube stars than astronauts. This might seem disappointing, but the fact is, YouTubers attract massive global audiences with tools students have at their fingertips. Can we tap into these skills to help students build positive influence around ideas that matter, in spaces they enjoy?

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Managing Digital Distractions in the Classroom
Using technology with students has great potential, but brings challenges including student distraction, loss of control, and growing concern about screentime. This session will highlight strategies and approaches to help manage those challenges within your classroom, helping create an engaging and empowering learning environment with the tools you have!

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Helping Parents Understanding Your Connected Classroom
As teachers, we’re often excited about new ideas for classroom technology use - but parents don’t always feel the same. How can we help them understand the benefits of connected classrooms, or why children should share learning online? This session will highlight ways you can help parents appreciate the value of technology for learning.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: 5 Key Strategies to Build Critical Literacy in the Classroom
In a world of fake news and alternative facts, understanding how to navigate the endless stream of content at our fingertips is even more essential than ever! In this session I’ll share 5 key strategies (and tools) to build critical literacy skills in the classroom.

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Rick Crosslin
Biography:
Rick Crosslin, Scientist in Residence at MSD Wayne Township, awards 2015 TechPoint Foundation Bridge Builder, 2016 Creative Teaching Award Eli Lilly Foundation, 2011 AMA Education Outreach, 2010 Indiana Wildlife Federation Conservationist, Indiana 2010 Society Journalism Best Indiana Environmental & Medical/Science Reporting, 2009 Emmy Indiana Expeditions, 2005 Emmy Technical Achievement PBS WFYI, 2004 Indiana University Distinguished Alumni, 2001 Christa McAuliffe Fellow, 1999 Hoosier Association of Science Teachers Inc. Distinguished Service Award, 1998 Milken Educator Award, 1990 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, 2008 National Mineral Educator. 44 years’ experience summer science camps, director MSD Wayne STEM Science Summer Safari. Taught grades 3-6 in Indiana and Cairo, Egypt, graduate courses for IUPUI, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, and former camp director Diabetes Youth Foundation of Indiana. Host and executive director of Emmy award winning Indiana Expeditions WFYIPBS. Host and Executive Producer The Great American Total Solar Eclipse 2017 and Rick Crosslin Science YouTube Channel Rick Crosslin Science : https://www.youtube.com/Rick Crosslin Science

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Flight, Motion, and Design - Building and Flying the FPG9
Explore flight, motion, and design process with model airplanes. In this workshop participants will build, trim and fly model airplanes designed for classrooms grade 3 and above. Learn how to use “scientific methods” and “design processes” with the FPG9 (Foam Plate Glider 9”). Teachers will receive Academy of Model Aeronautics resources to explore model aviation.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Discrepant Events - Science That Defies Your Senses!
Discrepant Events are demonstrations that seem to be lies! Demonstrations where the brain does not believe what the eyes see. Discrepant Events have the power of enthusiastic student engagement. Learn ways to sharpen observation skills of what you are seeing and make you think a different way.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Air Pressure + Sound Vibration = Science Fun!
Sound is vibration. Come make some noise as we explore sound energy. Join me in hands-on investigations and demonstrations to understand air pressure and sound vibration. This is an audience participation event that will be heavy on rhythm, vibration and fun. It may not be musical – but it will be science!

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) - Owl Pellet Discovery
Join us as we use the Next Generation Science Standards three dimensions of science learning: cross cutting concepts, disciplinary core ideas, science and engineering practices. We will use an elementary “owl pellet” inquiry lesson to see how dimensions are combined to form each standard - or performance expectations - to build student understanding.

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Linda Elkins-Tanton
Biography:
Prof. Lindy Elkins-Tanton is the lead of the NASA Psyche mission, co-chair of the Interplanetary Initiative at ASU, and co-founder of Beagle Learning, a tech company training and measuring collaborative problem-solving and critical thinking. Elkins-Tanton received her B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from MIT. She has led four field expeditions in Siberia. Asteroid (8252) Elkins-Tanton is named for her. In 2013 she was named the Astor Fellow at Oxford University. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, and of the American Mineralogical Society, and in 2018 she was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences.She and her teams are working toward a positive space exploration future, and toward creating a generation of problem-solvers.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Leadership for Teachers
In this workshop, we will provide structures for teachers to identify what our goals are as teachers, and to think innovatively about how to achieve those goals.This work will include developing or expanding our personal values alongside understanding the values of the educational system they are in.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Future of Education: Does a focus on required content liberate or oppress learning?
Here is a controversial idea: Content is no longer the differentiator in education. In this workshop we will discuss what content feels indispensible, and what content feels extraneous…and whether what students really need is to internalize the process of learning, so they can be lifelong learners.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Training ourselves and our students to ask powerful questions
Asking the right question is often the key to finding the right path in learning, in work, in life. In this workshop we will investigate the kinds of questions we ask, how to encourage question-asking in our students, and even how to grade the excellence of questions.

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Vlad Gogelescu
Biography:
Vlad Gogelescu is a curriculum development specialist with over 17 years experience in creating and running courses in social studies, including Law, Geography, Individuals and Societies and Global Politics. He has also designed and implemented service learning and experiential education programmes in the UK, Nigeria, Kenya, The Netherlands and Romania. As a true advocate of holistic education, Vlad believes that education can change people's lives, equip them with the skills needed to deal with a future of uncertainties and offer an insight into unique career opportunities.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Set-up and Integration of Service Learning in the Curriculum
The session will explore the set-up of meaningful service learning programmes: the logistics the challenges the relevance the impact.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Global Politics Curriculum Development
Why Global Politics How to develop a Global Politics Program

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Susan Gomez-Zwiep
Biography:
Dr. Susan Gomez Zwiep began her career in science education as a middle school science teacher in Los Angeles where she spent over 12 years working in urban settings. She is currently Professor in the Science Education Department at CSU Long Beach where she teaches courses in undergraduate STEM pathways, teacher preparation and the Masters of Science Education program. She also serves as a Regional Director for the K-12 Alliance@WestEd, which provides high-quality professional development in science and mathematics for K12 educators. She is currently involved in several professional development grants supporting K-12 teachers to understand and implement new standards (Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards), including the NGSS Early Implementer Initiative. Dr. Gomez Zwiep consistently works toward establishing equitable access for all students to rigorous, inquiry-based science instruction and supporting teachers in their journey to become advocates for students, science education, and their own professional development. She has been published in both research and practitioner journals such as Science and Children, Science Scope, the Journal of Science Teacher Education and the International Journal of Mathematics and Science Education. In addition, Gomez-Zwiep has contributed book chapters to publications such as Integrating Inquiry into the Science Classroom: Challenges and Possibilities and Professional Learning Communities for Science Teaching: Lessons from Research and Practice.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Science as a Tool for Language Development
Science can be an effective mechanism for language development, providing a rich and authentic context for developing English language skills. With appropriate supports, students can participate in highly engaging and complex science learning experiences that support the development of their English skills, where language use is a natural part of how students make meaning. In this session we will explore methods of developing rich science learning experiences, strategies for ensuring that science learning is accessible for English Learners and also a rich context for language development.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Science Notebooks As a Tool for Sense-Making
Scientists have often used journals and notebooks to record their thoughts and ideas, documenting their scientific discoveries. Using science notebooks in your classroom can serve a similar purpose and can be an effective tool for students to record their observations, make sense of their ideas and assess their understandings. Explore how to use science notebooks to support student meaning-making and learning in the science classroom. Appropriate for K-12.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Next Generation Science Standards
Phenomenon based, three dimensional learning is changing the way K12 students learn science. In this session learn more about the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the instructional shifts they are bringing to K12 classrooms to create rich sense making and deep learning. Experience an NGSS lesson and learn how to structure learning experiences so students can use the Science and Engineering Practices, Cross Cutting Concepts and Disciplinary Core Ideas to understand natural phenomenon and the interconnected nature of science as it is practiced and experienced in the real world.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Science as a Tool for Language Development (repeat)
Science can be an effective mechanism for language development, providing a rich and authentic context for developing English language skills. With appropriate supports, students can participate in highly engaging and complex science learning experiences that support the development of their English skills, where language use is a natural part of how students make meaning. In this session we will explore methods of developing rich science learning experiences, strategies for ensuring that science learning is accessible for English Learners and also a rich context for language development.

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Shannon Hancock
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Tanya Howden
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Tanya is the Learning Experience Designer for Scottish education company, Robotical, the creators of Marty the Robot. As part of her role at Robotical, she is responsible for developing the educational offering including designing learning resources and leading outreach activities. Originally from the Highlands in the North of Scotland, she started her journey into computer science and education through helping with younger classes in high school and securing computers for the local youth club to start up a homework club. After meeting the Global Head of Mobile Technology for Thomson Reuters, during his visit to the class that she was mentoring through the Apps for Good programme, Tanya was headhunted and offered a summer internship at their London offices before starting university. This work in the local community got Tanya shortlisted for the One to Watch category in the 2015 FDM Everywoman in Tech awards at just the age of 19. She moved to Edinburgh to complete a degree in Computer Science at Heriot-Watt University where she was one of the top five students in her year. During her time at university, she continued to work with Apps for Good to inspire and support more students to mentor younger classes at their own school and was key to bringing the CoderDojo community to Edinburgh. Tanya is also a strong woman in technology ambassador who co-founded the Women@CS group at Heriot-Watt University and regularly contributes to many online platforms to champion the cause. Currently, on top of her work with Robotical, Tanya also works as a consultant on digital learning and careers for organisations such as International Summer Schools in Scotland, the Stemettes initiative for inspiring girls and Heart of Midlothian Football Club’s ground-breaking Digital Skills Programme.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Sport & STEM: A Case Study on Hearts FC
This workshop will explore a Scottish football team’s ground-breaking initiative allowing young people to discover and gain digital skills. The case study will highlight how STEM subjects can be used to engage and create meaningful learning experiences for individuals who may be uninterested in this area.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Should you let robots into your classroom?
Previously robotics was considered to be the stuff of sci-fi movies and university labs. As they have become more accessible there is a growing trend to have them in schools. This workshop will explore how to include programmable hardware in your curriculum and best practices for utilising robots in classrooms.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Programming Unplugged
Introducing students to programming can be a complex and challenging task. Yet, the basics are often best taught unplugged, allowing for students to relate abstract concepts to real world examples. This workshop will discuss how to step away from the computers and use computational thinking to learn and solve problems.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Uncovering Coding Unicorns: Gender Diversity in STEM
Females working in some areas of technology, such as data science, are sometimes referred to as unicorns because of how rare they can be in that field. In this workshop, we will investigate the different approaches you can adopt to inspire diversity in your STEM classes.

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Steph Jones
Biography:
Stephanie (Steph) Jones is the Prevention, Awareness and Education (REACH) Manager for anti-human trafficking organisation, A21 Thailand. Prior to relocating from Australia, Steph was a sessional academic the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), teaching human rights & ethics and sexual crimes classes. Steph has a Research Masters of Applied Science in Public Health and Social Work (focusing on human trafficking prevention in South East Asia), a bachelor’s degree in Human Services (Children and family services major), a bachelor’s degree in Arts (Human Rights and Ethics major) from QUT.  In 2016 Steph presented at TEDxAPU in Beppu, Japan, about human trafficking. She has published in the Journal of Human trafficking and is currently serving on the Australian board of directors for SUSTAIN Projects Myanmar (operating in Myanmar, Thailand).

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Engaging school communities in the fight against human trafficking
Children are the future leaders of our nations and they are also some of the most vulnerable populations to exploitation and harm. In the sphere of human trafficking and exploitation, it is essential to not only raise awareness and equip children with the skills to prevent themselves from harm, but also to encourage them to become change makers themselves. Whether you teach at a school where children are vulnerable to human trafficking and exploitation, or your students are likely to be the future influencers of their nation, education on this issue is essential. As an anti-trafficking organisation, A21 focuses not only on assisting survivors of human trafficking, but also on educating children using child-centric, play and activity-based programs. We are excited to share more about this.

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Lee Ann Jung
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Cathryn Kaye
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Stuart Lowe
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d'Arcy Lunn
Biography:
d'Arcy Lunn's dreams and daily life are dedicated to see a world with access and opportunity for everyone, everywhere! For the past 19 years d'Arcy has experienced more than 90 countries, given over 1000 presentations to 100,000+ people and worked with leading development, environmental, social justice and global education organisations and people. His self-initiated concept and organisation, Teaspoons of Change, focuses on the personal choices, decisions and actions that have a positive impact on people and the planet. d'Arcy is often seen each year around the world facilitating youth empowerment programs, supporting global citizen education and working with leading development organisations and projects including as a communications specialist with UNICEF. Among other things d'Arcy has also built two self-sufficient Happy-simply tiny homes and in 2014 started Teaspoons of Change with a 1000km walk and 1500km bike ride in Japan. In June 2018 he completed a Master's in Peace Studies in Tokyo, Japan through the Rotary Peace Fellowship and now also gives Teaspoons of Peace presentations and workshops. d'Arcy is also an ambassador, advocate and enthusiast with many organisations including: World's Largest Lesson, JUMP! Foundation, Global Citizen, End Polio Now, UNICEF, WHO, Gates Foundation, RESULTS, the Global Education and Leadership Foundation, Live Below the Line, the Future Business Council and many others.

See more - http://teaspoonsofchange.org/index.php/darcy-blurb-and-pictures/

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Global Citizenship - who we are, not what we do
A clear vision for the future needs practical action today. Teaspoons of Change are small but significant ideas and actions that have a positive impact on people and the planet. If we are to achieve the UN SDG Global Goals, then we need to have a personal and practical connection with them - one teaspoon at a time. This interactive workshop will explore how schools, educators and students can incorporate and integrate the SDGs into who we are and not just something extra we do in service or global issues classes. Participants will walk away with a global citizenship education lens to enhance their teaching and daily lives learning some key and simple concepts, models and approaches to being active and effective global citizens. See more - http://teaspoonsofchange.org

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Turning Ideas into Action
Schools today are almost like mini (or large) NGOs, hoping to do good in the world but how do we know if good intentions match good outcomes and if there is a starting point of humility and humanity? I've been fortunate to work in development with UNICEF, Gates Foundation, WHO and others as well as being a teacher, campaigner and advocate. This workshop will explore models, perspectives, processes and practices that will enhance our efforts to turn good ideas into action with intention, humility and humanity. There will also be a key emphasis on advocacy, campaigning and social mobilisation through active citizenship and community participation in our own lives, schools and communities. See more on a guide to turning ideas into action - https://tinyurl.com/ToC-turning-ideas-action

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Teaspoons of Peace - supporting a culture of positive peace
Personal choices, decisions and actions contributing to a culture of positive peace - individually and collectively. I recently completed a Master's in Peace Studies in Japan that took me around the world working with practitioners from Search for Common Ground in Liberia to Peace Jam and with Nobel Peace Laureates Leymah Gbowee and Jose Ramos Horta. It also included studies of key peace education academics such as Betty Reardon and Paulo Freire. In this interactive workshop participants will take part in activities, discussions and group work to create individual and collective ideas, attitudes and actions that contribute to a culture of peace. See more: http://teaspoonsofchange.org/index.php/what-we-do/teaspoons-of-peace/ #restorativejustice #inclusion #conflictresolution #propeace

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Happy-simply: a sustainable lifestyle model and education project
Quantity or quality of life, and where the best things in life aren't things! I've lead two Happy-simply projects building two self-sufficient tiny houses off the grid. Beyond tiny houses this workshop will look at volunteering, community engagement and sustainability. In this workshop we'll discover and discuss ways in which we can bring sustainability and social justice into the classroom and classes as not just something we do, but as a part of who we are and where just enough is plenty. Plus, a detailed look at community engagement as well as aspects of solar and compost toilets to come together to build a tiny house or add any of these components into any home or school. See more - http://happysimply.wordpress.com & YouTube clips: https://goo.gl/2Tq5IS & https://goo.gl/HYCLB5

WORKSHOP 5
Title: Polio Points - award & point system impacting personally, locally & globally
Polio Points is an awards system that rewards students living the values or key competencies of the school and also contributes to the global eradication of polio. The system goes like this: students do good deeds associated with school values or competencies, teachers award them points, the points are matched with a donation, and donations go to polio eradication. There are many options to tailor this concept (not program) to enhance existing house points or rewards programs, or to simply turn values into action. Polio Points exists in a number of schools around the world and is open for anyone to use as a short-term campaign or deeply embedded into a school culture. Come explore, ask questions and walk through how you might intro a meaningful points system to your class or school

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Fawn Nguyen
Biography:
Fawn was a middle school math teacher for nearly 30 years; she started right after college in 1990. This is her first year as math coach for a public K-8 school district. She was the 2014 Ventura County Teacher of the Year. In 2009, she was awarded the Math Teacher Hero from Raytheon. In 2005, she was awarded the Sarah D. Barder Fellowship from the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth. Fawn blogs about her lessons and classroom teaching at fawnnguyen.com. Fawn authors three websites for teachers: visualpatterns.org, between2numbers.com, and mathtalks.net. She is also one of the editors for mathblogging.org. Fawn has been a keynote speaker and workshop facilitator at math conferences throughout the country. She is also part of the UC-Santa Barbara Mathematics Project leadership team since 2005. In 2012, she co-founded the Math Teachers' Circle in Thousand Oaks, California. Fawn served a three-year term as a committee member of NCTM's Professional Development Services Committee (PDSC) during 2015-2018.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Number Talks and Problem Solving
Number talk or math talk is a warm-up routine where students are doing mental math. Number talks help students develop number sense while using cognitive strategies that will help them work flexibly and efficiently with numbers. In addition, we will work with a couple of problem-solving tasks that are low entry and high exit. These tasks will enrich your existing curriculum by challenging all students through play and exploration in mathematics.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Visual Patterns and Problem Solving
I’d love to share with you how I use visual patterns as one of my warm-up routines. I’ll share key questions to ask students, helpful structures to build algebraic reasoning, and ways to kick it up a few notches once your students are familiar with working with patterns. With faithful implementation, using visual patterns provides a powerful tool to build confidence and flexibility in writing equations. In addition, we will work with a couple of problem-solving tasks that are low entry and high exit. These tasks will enrich your existing curriculum by challenging all students through play and exploration in mathematics.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Intentional Problem Solving
We will experience productive struggle through rich and challenging tasks that encourage perseverance and nurture critical thinking skills. We will implement a curriculum that endeavors to make math social, one that values collaboration and encourages play and risk-taking. We will explore various tasks including Conway Tangles and Problem of Points.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Visual Patterns and Problem Solving (Repeat)
I’d love to share with you how I use visual patterns as one of my warm-up routines. I’ll share key questions to ask students, helpful structures to build algebraic reasoning, and ways to kick it up a few notches once your students are familiar with working with patterns. With faithful implementation, using visual patterns provides a powerful tool to build confidence and flexibility in writing equations. In addition, we will work with a couple of problem-solving tasks that are low entry and high exit. These tasks will enrich your existing curriculum by challenging all students through play and exploration in mathematics.

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Karen Polak
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Marty Schmidt
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WORKSHOP 1
Title: Teaching for Social Conscience: Introducing the Humanities I in Action Curriculum
This workshop describes the origins, curriculum, key lessons and experiential learning activities in a 300-hour interdisciplinary service learning course taught at Hong Kong International School called Humanities I in Action, which has been offered to grade 9 students for the last 15 years. This course became the basis for doctoral research on the impact of this social conscience curriculum upon students, and is the focus of the first half of a soon-to-be released book entitled The Wisdom Way of Teaching: Educating for Social Conscience and Inner Awakening in the High School Classroom.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Spiritual Explorations for Every High School Student
What can educators do about the ever-increasing stress that students experience in our schools? High school teachers at Hong Kong International School are now completing a 4-year program called “Spiritual Explorations” (SPEX) that aims to support the psychospiritual health of all students. Not only do these courses reduce stress, but they also offer students key concepts and practices from the world’s religious traditions to inspire self-understanding and self-transcendence. This experiential workshop shares the curriculum and practices of the SPEX program, including its impact upon students. Aspects of this program form a significant portion of a forthcoming book entitled The Wisdom Way of Teaching: Educating for Social Conscience and Inner Awakening in the High School Classroom.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: The Enneagram and Mindfulness in the High School Classroom
The most powerful in-the-classroom transformative tool I’ve encountered in my career is a personality typing device called the Enneagram that I teach in an elective religion class called, “Service, Society, and the Sacred.” Following self-exploration of the strengths and weaknesses of their type, students in the class choose or design a mindfulness practice to help rebalance their personality. The result for most students is steady growth towards wholeness, especially in the areas of stress reduction, greater self-awareness, and increased positivity. This workshop will not only explain the approach taken in combining the Enneagram and mindfulness practices, but will also give time for participants to explore their own personality type.

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Candida Snow
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Julie Stern
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Julie Stern is the author of Tools for Teaching Conceptual Understanding, Elementary and Secondary, which are Visible Learning Aligned Resources. She is the thought leader behind the ​global ​workshop series, Making Sense of Learning Transfer, and is a certified trainer in Visible Learning Plus. Her passion is synthesizing the best of education research into practical tools that support educators in breaking free of the industrial model of schooling​ and moving toward teaching and learning that promotes sustainability, equity, and well-being​.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Imagine What School Can Be...
What would schools look like if we were developing students as collaborative innovators ready to tackle the world's most complex challenges? Picture a school organized around real-world problems that require the flexible application of each subject's concepts with an eye toward developing students' passions. We can achieve this vision using a simple but profound process that fosters learning transfer.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Visible Learning in Social Studies
Nearly all teaching strategies have some positive effect on student learning, but knowing which ones to use at the right time is a true mark of a skillful teacher. Join us for this social studies-focused workshop to learn practical strategies to move students from surface level learning, to deep learning and then to learning transfer, where they use their learning to unlock complex problems.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Designing Lessons for Real-World Transfer of Learning
Innovators don’t invent without a deep understanding of how the world works. With this foundation, they apply conceptual understanding to solve new problems. This workshop provides tools for how to help students uncover conceptual relationships and transfer them to new situations.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: 3 Steps to Empower Students to Change the World
The goal of learning is to develop strong thinkers and problem-solvers who can apply what they have learned in the classroom to innovate in the real world. That’s learning transfer. This workshop will help you break down the steps needed to engage and motivate your students and make your classroom relevant.

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James Tanton
Biography:
James Tanton (PhD, Princeton 1994, mathematics) is an author, a consultant, and an ambassador for the Mathematical Association of America in Washington D.C., currently serving as their Mathematician-at-Large. He has taught mathematics both at university and high-school institutions. James is absolutely committed to promoting effective and joyful mathematics thinking, learning, and doing at all levels of the education spectrum. James writes books and video courses, advises on curriculum, consults with teachers, and gives demonstration classes and professional development sessions across the globe. He created the MAA's Curriculum Inspirations project, serves as chair of the Advisory Council for the National Museum of Mathematics, and is a founder of The Global Math Project, an initiative set to transform the entire world's perception of what mathematics can and should be. Over 5 million students across the planet have taken part in a common joyous piece of mathematics to see how classroom mathematics serves as a portal for human joy, wonder, and delight.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Patterns: What to do if you believe in them. What to do if you don’t.
What's the next number: 2 4 6 8 __? Clearly it is 17.5, and I'll prove it to you this session! We all, including mathematicians, are excited by patterns, motivated by patterns, and are informed by patterns, but we should never trust patterns until iron-clad, logical explanations for them are proffered. In this session we'll play with patterns and learn how to find formulas for patterns - if you choose to believe them - and perform all sorts of mischief for when you don't!

WORKSHOP 2
Title: "Circle-ometry" (later coined Trigonometry): The Story and the Mathematics
Why is the trigonometric ratio "opposite over hypotenuse" called sine, from the Latin word sinus meaning a "twisty bit"? What curious quirk occurred in the history of the subject led to this? In this workshop we'll explore the delightful story of trigonometry from its beginnings-its historical beginnings-which one can argue are the natural beginnings for the young scholar too. The idea of focusing on right triangles (and hence the name "trigonometry") came late in the history of the subject and offers little initial context for students. Come see the what the standard curriculum material is like when turned back around to follow its natural historical development to let the delight, the ease, the joy, and the depth of understanding come to the fore.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Exponents and Logarithms: The Story and the Mathematics
There was a scientific crisis in the 1500s-all data manipulation had to be done by hand. Adding a string of numbers, although not fun, is doable. But multiplying a string of numbers by hand is outright horrid! (Pencil only: What's 3.56 + 7.89 + 1.66? What's 3.56 x 7.89 x 1.66?) The lack of ability to conduct arithmetic held back science!

Scottish mathematician John Napier (1550-1617) saved the day by inventing logarithms. One trouble, folk did not understand the theoretical underpinnings of his approach. It was obscure!

In this workshop let's explore the story of (exponents and) logarithms, demystify their mathematics, demystify them for our students today, and ask: Why should we still care about them? (After all, my smart phone multiplies.) Deep understanding and joy is the goal.

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Factoring, the Factor Theorem, and all that: Why do we teach it?
Most quadratics that arise in the real world do not have integer coefficients. And most quadratics with integer coefficients don't factor. So why is so much of the standard algebra curriculum focused on teaching factor as a standard technique for solving (carefully crafted) quadratic equations?

Let's explore this issue together, examining the context of this topic-the historical context, the meaningful thinking it perhaps teaches, and the further mathematics it leads to. This topic that is not going to leave the mathematics curriculum, but we can work to give it the context and deep value!

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Rick Wormeli
Biography:
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WORKSHOP 1
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WORKSHOP 2
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WORKSHOP 3
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WORKSHOP 4
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John Zola
Biography:
John Zola spent his career as a high school and middle school social studies teacher, most recently at New Vista High School, a "break the mold" public high school in Boulder, Colorado. Throughout his career, John developed interactive teaching materials and trained colleagues in active learning strategies and Socratic seminars. His workshops help teachers make the work and voice of students central in the classroom. John's sessions are interactive and participatory with a strong focus on practical classroom applications. In addition to his work in the secondary classroom, John taught Social Studies methods courses for the University of Colorado and served for several years as the Director of School and University Partnerships in their School of Education. John conducts in-service trainings on effective teaching strategies, classroom discussion and Socratic Seminars in schools and at conferences in the United States, Central Europe, Africa, and Asia.

WORKSHOP 1
Title: Playing With Concepts: Why Don't We Do It On The Floor!
Engaging instruction should provide regular opportunities for students to "critically think" and promote student "voice" in the classroom. Both of these goals are accomplished when students manipulate course concepts and/or content using flow charts. Doing it on the floor adds to the engagement. Come play with us.

WORKSHOP 2
Title: Scored Discussions: Teaching Discussion Skills AND Grading Student Talk
Scored Discussions both teach and "score" discussion skills. As a form of alternative assessment, they can facilitate a wide range of learning outcomes while, at the same time, reducing the number of papers a teacher needs to grade. Scored Discussions work in any content area in grades 1-12.

WORKSHOP 3
Title: Improving Classroom Discussion and Discourse: Get kids talking!
In classrooms, "who talks, learns!" This workshop explores ways to increase and IMPROVE the quantity and quality of student voice in elementary and secondary classrooms. The focal points of this participatory session are how to create an environment for student voice and specific classroom strategies that promote participation. Appropriate for intermediate through secondary!

WORKSHOP 4
Title: Teaching Controversial Issues With Rigor, Balance, and Structure!
Controversial topics and issues surround us--from the daily news to the literature we assign our students to the science lab. These issues are "alive" for students who should learn how to talk about them in a safe classroom environment. Effective and engaging strategies for promoting high quality discussion of contentious issues are modeled.

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