Special Presenters

Presenters Topics
Harvey Alvy Leadership
Graham Brown-Martin Learning w/o Borders
Carlene Firmin Child safety
Marc Frankel Leadership Through Partnership (LtP)
Chris Jansen Leadership Mentoring
Lee Ann Jung Assessment, Inclusiveness
Douglas Killgore Athletic Administration
John Littleford Leadership Through Partnership (LtP)
Rami Madani Leadership
Ellen Mahoney Mentoring, Transitions, and Social Emotional Learning
Jon Nordmeyer Assessment
Adam Olenn Admissions
Will Richardson Change Schools
Tom Schimmer Assessment
Dave Shepherd Advancement
Jennifer Sparrow Leading School Change/ Innovation Across Classrooms
Ann Straub Global Citizenship
James Warnock Supervision and Evaluation
Kendall Zoller Communication

 

Special Presenters


Harvey Alvy

Biography: Harvey Alvy served as an international school principal at the American International School in Israel, the American Embassy School in New Delhi, and Singapore American School. He was selected as a NAESP National Distinguished Principal for American Overseas Schools, and is a founding member of the Principals’ Training Center for International Schools. In 2004 Harvey received the Faculty Achievement Award for Teaching Excellence at Eastern Washington University, where he held the William C. Shreeve Endowed Professorship in Educational Leadership. Harvey’s most recent book is Fighting for Change in Your School: How to Avoid Fads and Focus on Substance (ASCD, 2017). He has co-authored, with Pam Robbins, Learning From Lincoln, The Principal’s Companion, The New Principal’s Fieldbook, and If I Only Knew. With Dr. Jane Liu, Harvey co-authored a Mandarin only book The Principal Management Handbook (2007) for Chinese school leaders; Harvey and Jane are presently working on an updated version of that book. He conducts presentations on the principalship, educational fads vs. ideas of substance, and the leadership of Abraham Lincoln.



Workshop 1
Title: Promoting Change that Counts: How to Avoid Educational Fads
Description: This interactive session, a shorter version of the preconference workshop, will help international school leaders address fads that undermine both innovative and timeless educational practices. This is a high stakes and urgent challenge that affects student achievement, teacher success, leadership effectiveness, curriculum, fiscal and resource accountability, professional development, and the confidence of international parents in their schools. The session, by the author of the recent book, Fighting for Change in Your School: How to Avoid Fads and Focus on Substance (ASCD, 2017), will review six “Red Flag” strategies to avoid harmful fads that educators confront, and six “Guidelines” to promote reforms of substance in schools. Workshop activities will provide leaders with practical professional development strategies to take home and share with their school colleagues, to positively impact student and teacher success.

Workshop 2
Title: The Life of New Principals: Challenges Faced and Tips to Succeed
Description: This workshop will examine the challenges (and surprises!) faced by new international school principals, and offer practical strategies and tips to succeed. The practical recommendations will focus on building relationships, positively impacting the school culture and, most importantly, teacher and student success. The workshop will also address how the principalship has changed in recent years, especially in relationship to leadership and management responsibilities. Critical workshop concepts are drawn from The Principal’s Companion (Corwin Press) and The New Principal’s Fieldbook (ASCD), both books co-authored by the presenter.

Workshop 3
Title: Lincoln's Gettysburg Address: A Template for 21st Century School Leaders
Description: President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is only 272 words. Yet that short extraordinary speech captures many of the attributes we expect from exemplary school leaders. These attributes include: communicating with clarity, promoting core values, focusing on the mission, displaying humility, modeling collaboration, and fostering hope. During this interactive session, presented by the co-author of Learning from Lincoln: Leadership Practices for School Success (ASCD, 2010), participants will analyze the speech with colleagues, and use it as a template to reflect on their own, unique, school leadership journey. Critical workshop goals include affirming and celebrating that journey, and considering ways to refresh one’s skills for the challenges ahead.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Graham Brown-Martin

Biography: Graham Brown-Martin is a leader in the field of foresight and anticipatory research, bringing together social, political and technological trends to consider how we might prepare ourselves for the future. He is the author of Learning {Re}imagined, the best selling book on global education published by Bloomsbury. He has enjoyed a 30 year career spanning the education, technology and entertainment sectors. He was the founder of Learning Without Frontiers (LWF), a global think tank that brought together renowned educators, technologists and creatives to share provocative and challenging ideas about the future of learning. He left LWF in 2013 to pursue new programmes and ideas to transform the way we learn, teach and live.

Today he runs an innovation and design consultancy to help international government agencies and other organisations navigate the future. He is retained as the Chief Education and Product Officer for pi-top, one of the worlds fastest growing learning companies, transforming the way we learn and solve challenges together.

>> http://www.grahambrownmartin.com/



Workshop 1
Title: Learning by Making
Description: Research shows that people learn better when they’re inspired and making something original for themselves or their community. This is learning by making and it is rooted in the learning theories of Vygotsky and Papert, social constructivism and constructionism respectively. During this highly interactive, hands-on workshop, Brown-Martin will explore with participants how, through the lens of making and project-based learning, we can de-silo traditional subject boundaries and nurture critical, creative and computational thinking skills to collaboratively solve real-world challenges.

Workshop 2
Title: Follow up from Learning by Making Workshop
Description:

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Carlene Firmin

Biography: Carlene Firmin MBE is a British social researcher and writer specialising in violence between young people, and founder of the MsUnderstood Partnership. She is a senior research fellow at the University of Bedfordshire.

Firmin was senior policy officer at Race on the Agenda (ROTA), and founded the GAG project (Girls Against Gangs, or Girls Affected by Gangs, or Gendered Action on Gangs). She has held positions of assistant director of policy and research at Barnardos, specialising in youth justice and sexual exploitation of children; principal policy adviser at the Office of the Children's Commissioner; and head of the secretariat for the Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Groups and Gangs. Between 2011 and 2014 she wrote a regular column "Girl in the Corner" in The Guardian. In 2013 she founded the MsUnderstood Partnership, a joint project between Girls in Gangs, Imkaan and the University of Bedfordshire. The project "aims to improve local and national responses to young people's experiences of inequality". Firmin is a senior research fellow in the Institute of Applied Research of the Department of Applied Social Studies at the University of Bedfordshire.

Firmin was awarded an MBE in the 2011 New Year Honours for "services to girls' and women's issues", and was the youngest black woman to have received this honour.



Workshop 1
Title: An interactive case sudy exercise to understand peer-abuse in schools
Description: This workshop will involve attendees taking part in an interactive case study exercise to improve how they understand and respond to peer-abuse in international school contexts. Participants will be guided to consider family, peer, school and neighbourhood factors that offer sources of protection and risk, and reflect on those that are most pertinent to an international school setting. Through this process they will identify points of learning for their own settings and actions they can taken back to develop safeguarding and practices within their setting.

Workshop 2
Title: A guide to safeguarding resources for preventing peer-abuse in schools
Description: In the workshop participants will be introduced to a number of resources designed for and with educationalists to use in the development of their safeguarding work. From study surveys, to bystander intervention, school policies to staff training, this workshop will offer participants the time to consider a catalogue of resources they could draw upon to address peer-instigated harm between students. Resources particularly support participants to identify and address contextual factors associated to harm which have rarely been considered in standardised safeguarding work.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Marc Frankel

Biography: Dr. Marc Frankel, Ph. D. is a senior consultant and partner in Triangle Associates, an international consultancy specializing in higher, independent and international education. A psychologist by training, Dr. Frankel facilitates governance workshops, leadership development programs, and strategic planning in the United States and around the world, and coaches numerous senior leaders in universities and independent and international schools. His clients include schools on every inhabited continent, including large and small institutions, Tier 1 universities, and associations that serve schools.

Marc has authored or co-authored numerous articles and white papers on issues in governance and leadership of schools and universities. He is beginning his 13th year as a member of the governing board at the Wildwood School in Los Angeles.


Co-Presenter: Abigail DeLessio

An experienced senior executive with over 15 years of success in educational leadership and board relations, Abbi DeLessio focuses on leadership searches and governance and organizational development to support international schools in achieving their mission and vision. Through facilitated workshops and direct leadership, Abbi provides strategic planning, focus and insight, enabling schools to develop short and long-term sustainable goals. Abbi has led boards in Europe and Asia in policy, standards, and process for continuous improvement in identification, recruitment, and cultivation of future institutional leaders. Abbi obtained a B.A. in Economics from Clark University and holds a Certified FT Non-Executive Director Diploma (Level 7). She has served as chair or member of numerous boards including Hong Kong International School; the Asian University for Women Hong Kong Support Foundation; and the Child Development Centre.

An experienced senior executive with over 15 years of success in educational leadership and board relations, Abbi DeLessio focuses on leadership searches and governance and organizational development to support international schools in achieving their mission and vision. Through facilitated workshops and direct leadership, Abbi provides strategic planning, focus and insight, enabling schools to develop short and long-term sustainable goals. Abbi has led boards in Europe and Asia in policy, standards, and process for continuous improvement in identification, recruitment, and cultivation of future institutional leaders. Abbi obtained a B.A. in Economics from Clark University and holds a Certified FT Non-Executive Director Diploma (Level 7). She has served as chair or member of numerous boards including Hong Kong International School; the Asian University for Women Hong Kong Support Foundation; and the Child Development Centre.

Workshop 1
Co-Presenter/s: Abigail DeLessio
Title: The Future is Female
Description: Available data demonstrates an undeniable link between gender diversity and organizational performance. In a recent update to a Zenger Folkman survey, women ranked higher than men in 13 of 16 leadership competencies, and a recent survey by Peakon found that women-led organizations are more likely to have engaged, inspired and satisfied employees. Still, it is estimated that globally it will take 217 years to reach gender parity. This workshop will focus on the need for systemic breakthroughs as opposed to incremental change. Through large and small group work, attendees will identify ways to meaningfully impact D & I, and defines ways in which women can be more effective champions for one another. The workshop will offer opportunities to practice skills essential to achieving gender parity: becoming a “Why Not” challenger, conceptualizing new futures, and identifying short-circuit pathways to advancement.

Workshop 2
Co-Presenter/s: Abigail DeLessio
Title: The Perfect Storm and How to Avoid It: Lessons from the Front Lines
Description: Schools are delicate systems, easily fractured and driven into crisis. The time and energy required to defuse a crisis are costly, diverting the focus of leadership away from the strategic work that supports the achievement of a school’s mission. Using case studies based on real-world situations and large and small group work, participants will conduct in-depth analyses on ‘Perfect Storm’ situations. Attendees will be guided through the anatomy of a crisis, learning to recognize the conflation of factors that led to a negative outcome. Emphasis will be placed on the decisions and actions of stakeholders and how, at points of inflection, alternate approaches may have led to better outcomes. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to avoid the ‘Perfect Storm’ through intentional leadership, best practice in governance, and strategic communication.

Workshop 3
Co-Presenter/s: Abigail DeLessio
Title: A Fresh Approach to Making Strategy
Description: Strategy for international schools has never been more urgent in importance nor daunting in complexity. A school’s strategic domain lies within a space bounded by the future of education (particularly international education) on one side, the future of each school’s locality (economically, demographically, socially, and politically) on another side, the school’s economic model on the third, and the competitive private school environment nearby. All four are (increasingly) fluid, meaning that the landscape onto which we plot strategy is itself undulating and unstable. Dynamics such as these call for a new design-thinking approach to strategy and this session will walk through ways to keep boards and administrators on a stable footing while preparing for futures that will look little like the past or present. Join us for fresh thinking on the strategy-making front.

Workshop 4
Co-Presenter/s: Abigail DeLessio
Title: Culturally Congruent Leadership: A New Take On an Old Problem
Description: Management guru Peter Drucker’s famous quip that “culture eats strategy for breakfast” applies to leadership as well. Leadership that is culturally incongruent with a school and its stakeholders will fail even though it may be technically flawless in other respects. The wave of demographic change now sweeping across international schools from Bogota to Brunei is bringing with it cultural changes that up the ante for leadership and governance. This session will include a survey of the implications of culture change for schools, plus a model of how school administrators and board members can adapt their leadership to bridge any gaps between their styles and those now demanded by the school community. Culture is not the enemy of either strategy or leadership, but an equal player in the game, not to be underestimated or overlooked by those trying to move a school forward. Participants will leave this session with both a new appreciation for culture and a way of leading that

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Chris Jansen

Biography: Chris is a senior consultant with Leadership Lab www.leadershiplab.co.nz where he works alongside organisations in the education, health, social services and community sectors in a range of projects. These include design and delivery of leadership development programmes, change management initiatives, organisational capability and strategic planning.

In particular Chris is involved with the Grow Waitaha programme where 150 schools across Greater Christchurch have partnered with Ministry of Education, Ng?i Tahu, and 4 providers over the last 4 years to explore future focussed pedagogy including student agency, collaborative teaching, flexible learning spaces, cultural narratives, authentic curriculum and diverse partnerships. www.growwaitaha.co.nz This process includes individual coaching and mentoring of school leaders, facilitation of collaboration between schools to share innovation, and the curation of successful case studies to benefit the wider public sector.

Chris is a Senior Fellow at the University of Canterbury, where he teaches and supervises leaders studying in the Masters of Business Management and Post Graduate Diploma of Strategic Leadership. Chris is also involved in executive coaching and regularly facilitates workshops and presentations at conferences and with a range of organisations around New Zealand, Australia, the Pacific and Asia. He is currently facilitating leadership programmes with international schools in Singapore, Bangkok and Taiwan. His qualifications include a PhD in Management and Master's degree in Education (Counselling).



Workshop 1
Title: Igniting Emergent Change
Description: We are familiar with well-planned and programmed change management. However sometimes individual people get to the point where they see an issue that inspires or aggravates them so much that they just have to do something to respond to this immediate need in their context. This self-organising emergent change can be extremely powerful and yet the process by which is happens can seem ambiguous and perhaps risky. In this workshop we will use the phrase ‘Determined collaboration around a compelling purpose ignites possibilities’ to understand why such change occurs and how it can be impactful. We will also explore a range of frameworks that guide how this emergent change can lead to organisational or community transformation. Specific processes will be discussed including 1) Identifying an issue (why), 2) Engaging stakeholders (who else cares), 3) Co-designing solutions together (how) and 4) Implementing, reflecting and refining in real time (what). A range of case studies will be in

Workshop 2
Title: Collective Leadership Through Strategic Planning
Description: They say "Culture eats strategy for lunch" and yet how often have we ourselves creating the most superbly insightful and coherent strategic plan and yet wonder why this plan seems to fail to gain traction in genuine transformation across our organisation. Positive and sustainable change is notoriously hard to lead so it’s critical that we develop an approach that engages fully with the culture of our organisations and communities. In this workshop we will explore contemporary developments in strategic planning which prioritize ownership throughout the culture of our learning communities. We will focus on three critical concepts; 1) Fostering interaction and shared learning to harness collective intelligence, 2) Linking leadership development to strategic planning to activate the leadership ‘engine room’ and 3) Intentional clarity of focus to ensure alignment across all stakeholders. To do this we will review a range of current case studies from international schools in the region.

Workshop 3
Title: Growing Leadership Through Mentoring
Description: Leaders of learning grow the capability of the colleague that they work with. This involves shifting from the role of line manager to that of coach and mentor. In this workshop we will explore several modes of mentoring including a) more experienced to less experienced leaders (ie a supervisor or coaching style of model) and b) a peer to peer model where the support is mutual between pairs or small groups of leaders. Workshop participants will experience a number of practical tools for each mode that they can adapt and apply in their settings. Finally, we will connect to the outcomes of the pre-conference workshop which will have focussed on reviewing and refreshing the EARCOS Leadership Mentoring (ELM) programme to in order to extend the scale and impact of this programme.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Lee Ann Jung

Biography: Lee Ann Jung is an educator, author, and consultant specializing in the areas of inclusion and assessment and grading for students with disabilities. She provides support internationally to schools on inclusion, standards-based grading, and intervention planning and progress monitoring. Jung has worked in the special education field since 1994 and has served in the roles of teacher, administrator, consultant, and professor and director of international school partnerships at the University of Kentucky. Jung has written several books and more than 40 articles on the topics of inclusion, assessment and grading, and educating students with disabilities. She is currently a clinical professor at San Diego State University, where she developed the International Inclusive Leadership Program, which is a 5-course program that prepares leaders, general educators, learning support educators, counselors, and other school personnel to lead teams in designing and delivering effective accommodations, modifications, and interventions within general education settings.



Workshop 1
Title: YOUR STUDENTS, MY STUDENTS, OUR STUDENTS: rethinking equitable and inclusive classrooms
Description: The pressure for curricular poses real challenges for schools aiming to meaningfully include students with disabilities and developmental delays. All too often, the focus of learning support time must be spent ensuring the student completes the high-level assignments required in the subject areas. But where do we find the time to “pause” the hectic schedule and use evidence-based practices to teach the critical skills these students need for long-term success? In this session, participants will engage in small and large-group dialogue on this topic after learning 4 necessary components of learning support for meaningful inclusion.

Workshop 2
Title: HEALTHY GRADING PRACTICES for Students with Learning Differences
Description: Assigning fair and meaningful grades to students with learning differences is a difficult task faced by every teacher. Very little guidance can be found in policy or the field of special education to help teachers with this challenge. In this session, participants will learn about the move to standards-based grading for all learners. Participants will learn to use a 4-step Differentiated Assessment and Grading Model for grading and reporting achievement of students with learning differences in a way that is fair, meaningful, and legally defensible. The model is appropriate for students with disabilities, language learners, and those receiving intensive intervention.

Workshop 3
Title: ASSESSMENT, GRADING, & FEEDBACK: digging deeper
Description: For those who have been on the path to reforming assessment and grading practices, we will dig deeper into your priorities. In this interactive and adaptive session, meet and collaborate with others on the journey to heathier assessment and grading. Participants will engage in an activity to generate their top priorities for questions and concerns to address. We will use small and large group dialogue to construct an understanding of the challenges ahead and share with one another those solutions, processes, resources, and connections that have been helpful on this journey.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Douglas Killgore

Biography: Doug Killgore, CMAA, recently retired after 29 years in education, 18 of which were in administration as an assistant principal and athletic director. He continues as The Bow Tie AD, a professional development presenter targeting leaders of education-based athletics and activities. Killgore, the Past Board Secretary of the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association (NIAAA) has presented in 13 states as well as at multiple NIAAA national conferences and the EARCOS Leadership Conference in Bangkok in 2017. He has received the NFHS Citation Award as well as the NIAAA Section 6 Kovaleski Professional Development Award, the NIAAA State Award of Merit and the NIAAA Thomas E. Frederick Award of Excellence. Killgore is a member of the Arkansas High School Athletic Directors Hall of Fame.



Workshop 1
Title: LTC 503: Enhancing Organization Management
Description: This course outlines an approach to the fundamentals and methods of athletic administration and alerts and educates athletic administrators regarding potential problems and possible solutions in areas such as special events, public relations, awards, fundraising and Booster Clubs. The course also touches upon ways to increase or improve citizenship and sportsmanship through positive initiatives. Athletic Administrators will have a hands-on experience creating handbooks and a strategic plan for their school.

Workshop 2
Title: LTC 508: Legal Issues III – Hazing, Constitutional Law, Disabilities Law, Employment and Labor Law
Description: This course provides coverage of the legal standards governing hazing in interscholastic athletics programs and strategies for developing, implementing, and documenting effective anti-hazing policies, along with extensive coverage of the constitutional rights of student-athletes that must be respected by schools when sanctioning athletes for misconduct, the impact of federal disabilities legislation on school sports programs, and the employment and labor law issues related to the administration of interscholastic athletics programs, regarding minimum wage and overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Workshop 3
Title: LTC 510: Legal Issues IV - Social Media, Transgender Participation, Event Management & Security, Pregnant & Parenting Student-Athletes & Intellectual Property
Description: This course provides coverage of the legal standards governing hazing in interscholastic athletics programs and strategies for developing, implementing, and documenting effective anti-hazing policies, along with extensive coverage of the constitutional rights of student-athletes that must be respected by schools when sanctioning athletes for misconduct, the impact of federal disabilities legislation on school sports programs, and the employment and labor law issues related to the administration of interscholastic athletics programs, regarding minimum wage and overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


John Littleford

Biography: John Littleford served as teacher, trustee and head of school for over 25 years. For the past 28 years he has been a consultant to over 5000 independent and international schools. His clients also include corporations, foundations, universities and a range of other non-profit organizations. Mr. Littleford's areas of expertise include: board governance, strategic planning, executive and faculty compensation and evaluation; executive searches; marketing strategies including admissions; fund raising, managing change; school climate; institutional and financial audits; and team building. His widely read landmark book, "Faculty Salary Systems in Independent Schools" was published by the National Association of Independent Schools for 20 years. John Littleford speaks and leads workshops at Conferences all over the world. Littleford & Associates' Newsletter is published four times a year and is widely read by 25,000 trustees and school and not for profit leaders.



Workshop 1
Title: The Most Effective Way to Market Your School and Build a Culture of Charitable Giving
Description: This session will teach participants how to spend less money on traditional branding and marketing and fundraising consultants by recruiting, educating, training and marshalling a supportive “army” of parents to serve as admissions and/or fundraising ambassadors or advocates. In the marketing realm, they assist appropriately in internal and external marketing and support the overall admissions effort. In the development/advancement area, they boost annual giving campaigns. There is a proven strategy to mobilize parents into a pyramid of powerful, active and informed volunteers. It begins with a clear mission exemplified in a compelling and memorable story told in a language that inspires trust and elicits a passionate response. Then listen to parents and make them feel valued. Using their own positive comments about the school's strengths, show them the difference they can make as marketing specialists and fundraising agents serving the school. The power of greater parental pride cannot be underestimated.

Workshop 2
Title: Mission-Based Faculty and Head Compensation: Recruiting, Retaining, Supporting and Rewarding the Best
Description: The first goal of this session is to promote this important dialogue: If we could start with a blank slate, what faculty compensation and benefit system would we build and why? How would it serve the school’s mission and financial sustainability? How would it attract, retain and reward faculty who will advance a school’s mission and vision? We will show several salary system models and the messages that they send. The second goal of this session will outline for heads and boards a range of approaches that schools are using to recruit, compensate and reward heads, including providing various incentives. Whether or not one believes in performance related pay for heads, the trend is for more competitive and creative compensation regardless of school size. A head support subcommittee of the board should annually benchmark the head’s compensation and provides for a process that makes heads and their families feel valued.

Workshop 3
Title: Governance Standards for Accreditation for Nonprofit and Privately-Owned Schools
Description: What does an accrediting body look for when it delves into the governance aspect of a nonprofit and privately-owned school? How many members are there and how are they chosen? Is there any evidence of a conflict of interest on the board? How transparent is its decision-making? Is there a long-range financial plan in place? Has it engaged in any strategic planning? When it comes to governance practices, all boards must adhere to the same standards of best practice. Learn how to be prepared for the governance review of the accreditation process.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Rami Madani

Biography: Rami Madani is the Head of the International School of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Prior to that he worked in schools in Yemen, UK, Zambia, and India, serving students and faculty at all school levels. He has taught subjects ranging from Mathematics to Music to Theory of Knowledge. He has served as a secondary school principal, director of learning, dean of students, and department head in various international schools. Rami has designed a variety of professional development and training programs. In addition, he is an IB Diploma consultant and is passionate about aligning a school's systems with its mission, and ensuring that teaching and learning is the focus of what schools do. Rami presents at conferences and works with schools on areas related to strategic planning, leadership, growth & evaluation, curriculum, assessment and instruction. His primary focus is on nurturing minds, empowering educators, refining systems and tools to support student holistic growth.



Workshop 1
Title: Innovative, Differentiated, and Sustainable Orientation Program for New Teachers
Description: How do we ensure that the mission, vision, values and practices of our schools are sustained and advanced as faculty and staff turnover? How do we provide an orientation program that is differentiated, self-managed, and which encourages teachers to be self-directed learners? Access to differentiated online learning, flexible learning time, clearly defined expectations, and an approach that provides accountability are essential to ensure that new and returning faculty have the same set of knowledge and skills. This session presents how to develop a school’s knowledge base and use it to design individualized, manageable training, better preparing teachers to operate in alignment with the school’s direction and practices.

Workshop 2
Title: To what extent is your school meeting its mission? A systematic approach to embedding life-worthy skills in teaching and learning.
Description: We all believe in the value of embedding essential, life-worthy skills and dispositions in our students. Some schools refer to these as School-wide Learning Results, Graduate Profile, or Learner Profile. This session focuses on top ranking skills and dispositions, provides simple, research-based indicators for each, and shares resources that help leaders plan so that teachers teach and assess each indicator. It will empower school leaders to concretize and demystify life-worthy learning in their schools and provide them with tools, processes, and strategies to support their teachers to do the same. The session also demonstrates the power of how a common institutional understanding around these life-worthy skills and dispositions can help schools achieve their mission more effectively. We all believe in the importance of preparing our students to succeed in their future and this session will share a pathway for achieving this aim.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Ellen Mahoney

Biography: Ellen Mahoney, M.Ed., is the CEO of Sea Change Mentoring which provides support for international schools developing social and emotional learning, mentoring, advisory, and transitions programs as well as blended learning opportunities and certification for school staff in adult social and emotional learning competencies. Ellen has served on several boards including Families in Global Transitions and is a Council of International Schools Affiliated Consultant. She was awarded a New York City Council Citation for her work supporting mentoring programs and named a David Pollock Scholar and an Echoing Green Semifinalist for her groundbreaking work with international schools and third culture kids. Ellen has contributed her expertise to the National Mentoring Partnership’s work on e-mentoring best practices and her work has been featured in publications like The Chronicle for Evidence-Based Mentoring and Ruth Van Reken and David Pollock’s ​Third Culture Kids, Growing up Among Worlds, 3rd



Workshop 1
Title: Surveying the Landscape: Common Practices, Challenges, and Opportunities in International School Transition Support
Description: In an effort to better understand the transitions support landscape in international schools, Sea Change Mentoring and Globally Grounded partnered together to conduct an independent research project. Building on the important work of Barbara Schaetti, Council of International Schools, and Doug Ota, our research provides a deeper understanding of the transitions-support practices, challenges, and opportunities that the international school community faces. Join us as we share our findings and discuss the implications for how schools and organizations can improve the way they care for young people impacted by global mobility and how this kind of support is a learning and wellbeing issue.

Workshop 2
Title: Choosing the path forward: Adapting your school to meet the social emotional learning needs of your students
Description: “The promotion of social, emotional, and academic learning is not a shifting educational fad; it is the substance of education itself.” This is the 2019 declaration from The Aspen Institute’s National Commission on Social, Emotional, and Academic Development. Even if leaders are only in the beginning stages of thinking through a social-emotional learning initiative in their school, odds are they already have many of the working parts needed to be successful. In this session, we look at what research tells us what effective SEL implementation looks like, how we know when we are ready to begin that implementation, and what systems and approaches we are already using to achieve our SEL goals. Leaders will be equipped with tools, frameworks, and additional resources to support this work.

Workshop 3
Title: Relationship-based learning: International Schools' use of mentoring to deepen student learning
Description: All around the world, we are seeing international schools increasingly embrace mentoring as a mechanism to foster students’ sense of belonging, connect them to real-world learning opportunities, strengthen teacher-student interactions, and improve school climate altogether. In fact, as more educators understand that there is no separation between Social and Emotional Learning and academic rigor, schools are finding that mentoring is a perfect context for this kind of learning to take place. Join us as we explore the latest research, the most common implementation pitfalls, and the incredible opportunities mentoring affords schools. We will look at the examples of The American School in Japan, Singapore American School, Western Academy of Beijing and Beijing City International School and hear directly from them about their mentoring program experiences.

Workshop 4
Title: It Starts With Us: Developing Social-Emotional competencies in faculty and leadership
Description: The number of international schools embracing Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is sharply increasing. Schools are investing in SEL curriculum and programs that teach teachers how to employ SEL pedagogy. However, research suggests that there is a critical gap in teachers’ professional development in SEL: development of their OWN social and emotional competencies. How can we expect students to develop SEL competencies if there are inconsistencies in the modeling of such competencies by the adults around them? This gap exists in the international school community and we must do a better job in addressing it if we want to run effective SEL organizations. Join us as we discuss the latest Social and Emotional Competencies research, which competencies faculty and administrators need to develop, and what effective professional learning might look like in this space.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Jon Nordmeyer

Biography: Jon Nordmeyer is the International Programs Director at WIDA. He has been an international educator and consultant for 25 years, teaching at international schools in Quito, The Hague, Taipei, Istanbul, Shanghai and Bangkok. Jon has presented at international conferences in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America and has taught graduate seminars at Harvard Graduate School of Education and Tibet University. He has written articles for International Schools Journal and Journal of Staff Development, co-edited the book Integrating Language and Content (TESOL 2010) and serves on the editorial review board of Globally Informed, a peer-reviewed journal for international educators.



Workshop 1
Co-Presenter/s: None
Title: Assessing English Language Learners: Turning Data into Action
Description: 21st-century international schools serve increasingly diverse transnational communities. Multilingual students are both learning a new language and learning in a new language. Effective assessment practices help educators to understand what learners can do, empowering teachers to build on student assets and scaffold both language and content learning.

Workshop 2
Title: Assessing English Language Learners: Turning Data into Action (Repeat)
Description: 21st-century international schools serve increasingly diverse transnational communities. Multilingual students are both learning a new language and learning in a new language. Effective assessment practices help educators to understand what learners can do, empowering teachers to build on student assets and scaffold both language and content learning.

Workshop 3
Co-Presenter/s: Patrick Kane and Christine Palumbo
Title: Collaboration to Support Multilingual Learners: NCPA and WIDA
Description: Nansha College Preparatory Academy (NCPA) uses an innovative approach to co-planning and co-teaching to ensure that effective EAL teaching happens every day. Important ingredients in the NCPA recipe for success are 1) integration of WIDA assessments and instructional resources and 2) leveraging students’ native Chinese to build literacy in English while unlocking content learning.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Adam Olenn

Biography: As founder of Rustle & Spark there are two things Adam loves most about this business: One is when clients say "finally, somebody gets us!" The other is putting talented people in situations that let their gifts shine. With 25 years of branding marketing and story-based communications experience for companies like Mercedes-Benz, Kellogg’s, Haagen-Dazs, Berklee College of Music, and Moses Brown School-and many more-Adam loves few things more than applying familiar principles to a new industry.



Workshop 1
Title: Web-slinging Without a Supervillain
Description: Learn how one school took an entirely different–and customer-centered–approach to its website that sidestepped technical hurdles, kept budgets low, and delivered a revolutionary new user experience that transformed online inquiries.

Workshop 2
Title: Ready, Action! Making Video the Best Tool in Your Kit
Description: Learn the principles of filmmaking from a school marketing perspective, with guidance on technical, artistic, and budgetary considerations. You’ll learn you to make videos that look and sound great on whatever budget your department can afford.

Workshop 3
Title: Let’s Give ‘Em Something to Talk About
Description: Shopping for an education for your child costs about the same as a new luxury car every year, except that the stakes are much higher. That’s why traditional product marketing has less impact, and why word of mouth remains the dominant marketing tool for most schools. Learn how to design a program of experiential marketing that makes word-of-mouth work for you far beyond your enrolled families.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Will Richardson

Biography: A former public school educator of 22 years, Will has spent the last 15 years developing an international reputation as a leading thinker and writer about the intersection of social online learning networks, education, and systemic change. Will is a co-founder of Modern Learner Media and co-publisher of ModernLearners.com which is a site dedicated to helping educational leaders and policy makers develop new contexts for new conversations around education. Most recently, Will co-founded Change School and, in addition, the Modern Learners Community, two online destinations for educational leaders interested in creating relevant, sustainable change in schools using a coaching, curation, and community approach.



Workshop 1
Title: 10 Principles for Schools of Modern Learning: What Reimagination Looks Like
Description: Based on a combined 50+ years of working with schools around the world, this session builds on the collaborative effort of Will and his colleague Bruce Dixon to identify the characteristics of schools that are successfully navigating a relevant, sustainable change process. We’ll not only look at the qualities of these schools, but we’ll also discuss jumping off points, places for further inquiry, and ways to enlist others in the school community to engage in the work.

Workshop 2
Title: Making Change Happen: A Process for Moving from Old to Bold
Description: While every school is different, there are a series of consistent steps that schools must take in order to create change that is relevant and sustainable. In this session, we'll take a look at a process that has been repeated over and over by those schools who have decided to shed the ineffective practices and structures of traditional schooling and create cultures and classrooms where modern learning flourishes.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Tom Schimmer

Biography: Tom Schimmer is an independent education author, speaker, and consultant from Vancouver, BC. Over the course of his career he has been a classroom teacher, school administrator, and district level leader. Tom is an internationally recognized leader and expert in the areas of assessment, grading, RTI, and educational leadership. He has delivered both keynote and workshop sessions at several national and international conferences. As well, Tom has worked directly with schools and school districts throughout Canada, the United States, Vietnam, China, Myanmar, Thailand, Japan, Qatar, Bahrain, India, the U.A.E., the U.K., Russia, Singapore, Spain, Kuwait, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Africa, and Nigeria. He is the author & co-author of six books, including best-seller Grading from the Inside Out: Bringing accuracy to student assessment through a standards-based mindset, and his latest release, Growing tomorrow’s citizens in today’s classrooms: Assessing seven critical competencies.



Workshop 1
Title: Grading from the Inside Out
Description: The development of a standards-based mindset is the oft overlooked, but essential first step for long-term grading reform. Based on his recently released book of the same title, Tom will outline how to take a standards-based approach to grading, even when a traditional grading and reporting paradigm exists. The non-negotiable grading true north of accuracy and confidence will be featured, as well as the three essential practices that serve as the cornerstone for developing a standards-based mindset will be explored.

Workshop 2
Title: Assessing Critical Thinking
Description: Critical thinking sits at the heart of the critical competencies essential for learners to develop in the 21st century. This session will highlight how educators can take advantage of their assessment fundamentals to seamlessly assess critical thinking. Specifically, participants will come to know how the specifist and generalist views of critical thinking can both contribute to schools developing a comprehensive approach to critical thinking, the variety of tools that can be developed in support of assessment, the instructional implications for creating the critical thinking opportunities, and the dispositional habits of critical thinkers.

Workshop 3
Title: Instructional Agility
Description: Critical thinking sits at the heart of the critical competencies essential for learners to develop in the 21st century. This session will highlight how educators can take advantage of their assessment fundamentals to seamlessly assess critical thinking. Specifically, participants will come to know how the specifist and generalist views of critical thinking can both contribute to schools developing a comprehensive approach to critical thinking, the variety of tools that can be developed in support of assessment, the instructional implications for creating the critical thinking opportunities, and the dispositional habits of critical thinkers.

Workshop 4
Title: Raising the Rigor in Assessment Design
Description: Rigor is about cognitive complexity, not volume. This session will focus on the ways in which teachers can ensure that the rigorous of their assessments match the intended rigorous of curricular standards. Specifically, participants will come to know the strengths and limitations of each assessment method, how to select the most appropriate method to ensure reliable information, why learning progressions are critical for sound assessment design, and the various types of rubrics that can make criteria transparent. The quality of assessments is critical to creating a rigorous learning experience that supports students in their pursuit of excellence.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Dave Shepherd

Biography: Dave Shepherd recently established a bespoke consultancy practice after 30 years’ experience in the schools’ sector, as both an educator and senior administrator. Dave specializes in the full range of Advancement disciplines, volunteer management and senior strategic leadership training for International and Independent schools globally. In 2006 Dave established the Development, Alumni Relations and Marketing and Communications Office as Director of Advancement at United World College of South East Asia (UWCSEA); a K1 – Grade 12 non-profit International school in Singapore. The Advancement team has raised over S$30 million, connected with over 15,000 alumni representing 140 countries and is supported by over 100 Parent Ambassadors and senior volunteer leaders. Dave has taught and presented regularly at CASE institutes, commissions and events. He chaired the 10th Asia-Pacific Advancement Conference in 2017 and is currently a trustee of the CASE Asia Pacific Board.



Workshop 1
Title: A Road Map to Advancement
Description: Establishing an Advancement function can be a daunting prospect. This workshop will guide you through the journey to establish a comprehensive institutional, sustainable and scaleable operation. The first part will ensure you have a thorough understanding of what Advancement is and is not for your school, how Advancement can distinguish your school from others and how to evaluate where you currently are on the journey. The second part will focus on establishing clearly defined goals, strategy, programme priorities, performance indicators and the opportunities for growth. It will stress the elements required to institutionalise Advancement work across the entire school.

Workshop 2
Title: Enhancing Education Through Alumni Engagement
Description: Parents frequently indicate that ‘word of mouth’ is a key influencer in selecting a school. Having a strong alumni relations programme has multiple layers of benefit to both the individual alum and the broader school community. This workshop will guide you through the process of establishing or elevating your alumni programme, whether you are starting out or looking to refine further. A simple four phased approach will be presented as a framework to identify, connect, engage and build resources around your best advocates; the accumulative outcome of your educational experience.

Workshop 3
Title: Establishing a Culture of Philanthropy through Annual and Regular Giving
Description: An annual and regular giving programme is often referred to as the bedrock of fundraising activity, it is however, as much about the intangible benefits as it is about the financial benefit. This workshop will prepare you with the knowledge to implement a comprehensive giving programme; evaluating the programmes, donor segments and giving methods that will work best for your circumstances. We will look at some of the key metrics and data points and finally, review some of the myths and trends in annual and regular giving, including the role of volunteers, technology and leadership giving.

Workshop 4
Title: The Art and Science of Major Gift Fundraising
Description: Whilst the quantum that defines a major gift varies widely, the strategy, techniques and pipeline management required to secure any face to face gift does not. This workshop will look at the science behind a major gift programme from prospect identification, prioritising, cultivation, solicitation and stewardship. It will focus on the art of the respectful “Ask”, evaluating what should be said by who and when. Finally, the workshop will introduce some performance metrics and key performance indicators that will give you the confidence to implement this potentially transformational work into your school.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Jennifer Sparrow

Biography: Jennifer Sparrow serves as the deputy superintendent of Singapore American School (SAS) and has previously had the roles of MS humanities teacher, director of assessment and educational data, and executive director of teaching and learning. In addition to her work at SAS, Jennifer has facilitated over ten EARCOS regional workshops and dozens of EARCOS leadership pre-conference and conference sessions on the topics of quality assessment, use of data, and change leadership. Jennifer is also an Associate Presenter in the areas of assessment and professional learning communities for Solution Tree. She received her doctorate from the University of Southern California in organizational change and leadership with a focus on leadership strategies to successfully scale (spread) innovation across a system.



Workshop 1
Title: Scaling Innovation
Description: Understanding how innovation scales (spreads) across a system can help leaders target specific strategies to lead this type of change. This workshop will begin with developing an understanding of how innovation scales and then will focus on several practical leadership strategies to help make sure practices spread across the system. Participants should come with an innovative change they are leading to use as a case study throughout the session.

Workshop 2
Title: Leadership Actions for Different Types of Change
Description: Not all change is created equal. Some changes require a certain set of leadership strategies while other changes require a different approach. Unfortunately, many school leaders do not take the time to analyze the type of change taking place to drive what strategies they will use. This workshop will begin by helping leaders develop an understanding of different types of change and how this should impact the leadership strategies they use. Participants will then focus on one or more changes underway in their context to determine what strategies they should start, stop, and/or continue using.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Ann Straub

Biography: Ann Straub is an International Advisor for the Council of International Schools (CIS). She is a Qualified Administrator for the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) and trains teachers and educational leaders who are strategically focused on developing intercultural competency and global citizens, intercultural leadership, and intercultural learning to promote diversity and inclusion. Ann was previously the Director of Curriculum and Staff Development at the International School of Bangkok and a trainer for the Principals' Training Center. She trains teachers and administrators in the United States and internationally who are strategically focused on developing intercultural competency and global citizens. Ann currently resides in Middlebury, VT with her husband Peter and their new Westie puppy, Daks.



Workshop 1
Title: Who, me?: Recognizing and Dealing with Our Own and Others Implicit Biases
Description: We all have biases and prejudices which spread through a culture like currency. How can we prevent our natural tendency to stereotype people from becoming prejudice and discrimination? As educational leaders, what is our role in schools, and how do we recognize and prevent the our own implicit biases and those of others from inhibiting learning? In this interactive workshop, we will look at the Stereotype Wheel, the research supporting our innate tendency to have implicit biases and the effect on student learning and teacher performance along with strategies to counteract this natural human tendency.

Workshop 2
Title: Leading Schools Interculturally
Description: What is meant by intercultural leadership, and do all cultures define and value leadership in the same way? What are the universal traits of successful leadership as defined by the Globe Study, and what specifically is required for a school focused on developing global citizens? There are a few questions which will be addressed in this interactive workshop. Most EARCOS schools have defined themselves as being "international" with the goal of developing global citizens. Participants will reflect on what this really means and will begin to develop an understanding of the leadership traits and strategies required to operationalize the vision of developing global citizens. This will be accomplished through looking at research, analyzing an international school case study, applying the traits of intercultural leadership using cultural frameworks, and reflecting on our own strengths as intercultural leaders.

Workshop 3
Title: Developing Global Citizens: What Does It Take?
Description: The words "global citizens" often appear in our school's guiding statements, but what this looks like and how to accomplish this is often frustratingly vague with a "hit or miss "approach prevailing. What does it look like to focus on developing global citizens as an institutional responsibility for doing so beyond the usual community service, social studies units, school garden and plastic bottle ban? By assessing where your school is by taking a 360 degree look at your whole school community, viewing examples of successful global citizenship frameworks and strategies used in other international schools, and learning about the place of intercultural competence within the development of global citizenship, you will leave this interactive workshop with an idea of where your school is and actions to take to realize your mission/vision of developing global citizens.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


James Warnock

Biography: James Warnock is a consultant with the Boston-based consulting firm Research for Better Teaching and has over 30 years of experience in education. His consulting work centers on instructional leadership, classroom instruction, supporting schools and districts in developing standards-based supervision/ evaluation systems and working with principals of underperforming schools. He has provided technical assistance to schools in Russia as part of a U.S. Department of State Community Connections program and has conducted teacher training in Australia. For fifteen years Jim directed the Sino-American Seminar on Educational Leadership for the University of Vermont's Asian Studies Outreach Program and has traveled and worked extensively throughout China. Recent and current clients include the Buffalo (NY) Public Schools, the KIPP School Leadership Program, Socorro ISD in El Paso TX, the University Liggett School, the Michigan State University sponsored Michigan Fellowship of Instructional Leaders, Fresno (CA) Unified School District and the Ministry of Education in Singapore. Prior to working with Research for Better Teaching, Jim was Assistant Superintendent of Schools for the city of Burlington, Vermont, and has also served as a secondary principal, K-12 staff developer and teacher. He is a co-author of The Skillful Leader II: Confronting Conditions that Undermine Learning (2008) and completed his undergraduate and graduate work at Brown University and the University of Vermont. Jim is the father of two grown children and lives with his wife, Carol, in Lincoln, Vermont.



Workshop 1
Title: The “Big Rocks” of High Expertise Teaching
Description: Teachers make countless instructional decisions every day but which ones have the biggest impact on student performance? This workshop will explore the “big rocks” of high expertise teaching, i.e., the strategies and skills that have the largest effect size on students and their academic growth. Our work at Research for Better Teaching in this area directly connects with the research of Robert Marzano and John Hattie in highlighting what makes the biggest difference for students and their learning.

Workshop 2
Title: Building Trust: The Key to Strong Adult Professional Culture
Description: Trust gives the leader the respect and the credibility to be listened to and followed. School leadership literature repeatedly identifies trust in the leader and trust among staff members as the sine qua non for high performing schools. Not coincidently, these qualities lead to feelings of safety and trust for students as well. But in between trust and the practices of strong adult professional culture is the mystery of what leaders do to build the trust and set those practices. This workshop will explore this “black box” while also facilitating participant discussion and reflection.

Workshop 3
Title: What Leaders Can Do to Build Strong Adult Professional Culture
Description: Our learning at RBT, supported solidly by research, is that there will be no sustainable improvement in student results and no elimination of achievement gaps until leaders and teachers succeed in strengthening key norms of behavior between adults. This workshop will share and explore 12 observable norms of interaction between adults we find to be central to the culture of a school that gets results for students. Handouts will be provided to support further participant reflection on the degree to which these norms of strong adult professional culture are observable in their schools.

^ back to top
------------------------

 


Kendall Zoller

Biography: Kendall Zoller, EdD, is an author, educator, researcher, and international presenter in communicative intelligence, presentation and facilitation skills, leadership and adaptive schools. He is co-author of Voices Leading From the Ecotone (2019) and The Choreography of Presenting: The 7 Essential Abilities of Effective Presenters (Corwin Press, 2010). Kendall is president of Sierra Training Associates and graduate faculty at California State University, Dominguez Hills and The University of Maine. He has authored over three dozen reviewed book chapters and journal articles on topics of communication, community, and leadership for educators and law enforcement. His work on leadership and presentation skills takes him to schools, districts, universities, state agencies, and corporations across the United States, Canada, Europe, China, India, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Europe. His lectures, presentations, and paper presentations include the campuses of Harvard, UC Berkeley, St. Anselm College, Boston University, University of Chicago, and Loyola University Maryland. Kendall has a doctorate in Educational Leadership a Masters in Educational Management. Kendall can be reached at kvzollerci@gmail.com



Workshop 1
Title: The First Five Minutes
Description: What should happen within the first five minutes of a presentation? Discover 9 things you can do within the first five minutes to produce a positive learning environment, a sense of community, and a willingness of participants to go on the journey with you. You will create an opening and discover how simple yet eloquent a deliberate choreography can be. What you create can be applied to meetings people look forward to, don’t look forward to, or may even be captive audience members to. Whatever your perspective, you may never look at openings the same again and may never do openings the same again.

Workshop 2
Title: 8 Steps for delivering a message when groups dont want to hear it
Description: Many of us have been in situations with colleagues where we have a message and we know they don't want to hear it. Imagine being able to deliver that message in ways that preserve relationships while at the same time increasing their receptivity to considering it. This session introduces a nonverbal/verbal framework derived from Grinder (2010) and modified by Zoller that intends to honor the relationships and address the challenging issues.

Workshop 3
Title: Voices from the Ecotone
Description: Many of us have been in situations with colleagues where we have a message and we know they don't want to hear it. Imagine being able to deliver that message in ways that preserve relationships while at the same time increasing their receptivity to considering it. This session introduces a nonverbal/verbal framework derived from Grinder (2010) and modified by Zoller that intends to honor the relationships and address the challenging issues.

^ back to top
------------------------